Los Angeles waterways are about to receive some much needed attention.

A recent article from sportfishingmag.com entails this latest effort to clean up the most populated part of California. The Los Angeles Water Board and The Environmental Protection Agency have teamed up to make some major improvements to 175 bodies of water in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. The effects of this clean up will be numerous. A few include reducing the amounts of bacteria, mercury, phosphorus, nitrogen, and many other toxic chemicals. This will ultimately help restore these ecosystems which will provide cleaner water to all forms of life in the area. It will be safer to consume fish and there will be fewer beach closures.
los angeles beach pollution
This plan calls for more than 95% of affected waterways to eventually meet water quality standards once the work has been done. This will definitely be quite an achievement considering that this is one of the most populated areas of the United States. California is well on its way in proving that it is possible to have both a high density population and very low water pollution levels.

Part of this new water pollution reduction effort is associated with something that has already been set forth in the Clean Water Act. States are being held responsible to make sure that the waterways that are polluted to meet TMDLs (Total Maximimum Daily Loads). It is sad that polluted waterways are still accepted as a given and that corporate polluters are given allowances in this regard. Ideally, there should be no allowable “loads” at all. At least California is taking a step in the right direction.

Locals will soon be able to really appreciate these efforts to clean up local creeks, rivers, and beaches. The ultimate goal is for places like Long City Beach to be open all the time, instead of closing due to high levels of bacteria. Waters in Santa Monica Bay are currently polluted with significant levels of toxic chemicals that make its fish inedible. Work that is underway will drastically reduce levels of toxins that are found in this body of water.

Corporate polluters aside, many of Southern California’s waterways have apparently been quite literally trashed. The burden to avoid this type of pollution in the future definitely falls on the community. State and government sponsored clean up efforts can surely go a long way, however, it will take a much better environmental awareness by the local community to prevent general trash from ending up in rivers and beaches.

Hopefully California will help influence and lead the way for other states to help clean up their local waterways. This is not a far fetched idea because this state is both large in size and power.

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Filed under: Clean WaterEnvironmentRegulatory Policywater pollution